Purpose of IEC 62474 “Material declaration for products of and for the electrotechnical industry”

The standard establishes the requirements for reporting the substances and materials included in electronic and electrical products. It also facilitates the transfer and processing of this data by defining a common data format which applies to exchanges in the supply chain. It can be used by other industries than the EE sector.

Purpose of IEC TR 62474-1

IEC TR 62474-1 establishes the requirements for reporting the substances and materials included in electronic and electrical products. It also facilitates the transfer and processing of this data by defining a common data format which applies to exchanges in the supply chain. It can be used by other industries than the EE sector.

Summary of standard requirement

IEC TR 62474-1 is an International Standard on material declaration. It includes

– The standard itself containing the declaration requirements,

– A database containing:

   – an XML-schema for data exchange format,

   – and a set of Internationally recognized lists for the electrotechnical industry (declarable substances, material classes, and exemptions).


The contents of the standard that may need to be updated regularly are provided in an online database which is maintained by a validation team of international experts freely available here.

A material declaration that conforms to IEC 62474:2018 needs to include at least a Declaration for Compliance or a Composition Declaration (it may also contain both).

– The Composition Declaration is used by a supplier (responder) to provide a hierarchical declaration of substances within product parts and materials that make up the product.

– The Declaration for Compliance is a simplified true/false declaration against each entry in a Declarable Substance List (DSL), indicating whether the declarable substance (DS) or declarable substance group (DSG) is present in the product above threshold.



History of IEC 62474

The first edition of IEC 62474 was published in 2012. For the first time, an international Standard spelled out the requirements for reporting substances in electrical and electronic (EE) products throughout the supply chain, thus helping industry to conform to national or regional legislation, and to implement ecodesign processes.

IEC 62474 has replaced national or regional standards, e.g. the Joint Industry Guide ( JIG-101) and the Japanese Green Procurement Survey Standardization Initiative ( JGPSSI).

The second edition of IEC 62474 was published in November 2018, in response to stakeholder requests from inside and outside the EE industry. IEC 62474 provides information on what to report and how to report it, including a separate mechanism for the exchange of data down the supply chain. The new edition enables users to employ two different methods for declaring substances. IEC 62474 comes with a validated open database, which includes a list of substances, substance groups and common material classes. It now also includes exemption lists from national and regional government legislation such as EU ROHS and China RoHS.


New Edition 2 published in December 2018

The IEC 62474:2018 standard introduces several new and revised capabilities to the International Material Declaration Standard based on emerging regulatory requirements, user feedback, and the needs of a broad range of industries. It provides significant flexibility for suppliers to provide material declaration information while ensuring that critical information for downstream manufacturers to assess product compliance is always available. The Data Exchange Format now includes a new Declaration for Compliance module and additional support for EU REACH compliance and the upcoming EU Substance of Concern in Products (SCIP) database. The changes were also intended to make the standard useful to a broad range of industries and different stages in the supply chain given the intertwined nature of global supply chains

Benefits of using IEC 62474

Government Authorities that issue substance restriction regulations need to have economic methods for regulated entities to obtain substance data to conform to these requirements that allow for international trade. IEC standards such as IEC 62474 are recognized by the World Trade Organization (WTO). This means that Government Authorities can adopt IEC 62474 to provide an economically feasible tool to its resident companies to achieve the substance restrictions, and be assured that such rules facilitate international trade and are in conformance with WTO standards.

Also, restricted substance regulations usually include exemptions for certain products based on available technology or other issues. Exemptions are dynamic and change often based on changes to technology and products. This requires Government resources to evaluate exemptions from product suppliers and exemptions issued by other Government Authorities to determine suitability. Governments may not be able to update exemptions based on a direct referral to exemptions issued by other Governments. This results in time lags to do analyses and grant updated exemptions, which can have negative impacts on local economies.

IEC 62474 now allows Government Authorities to adopt restrictions from other Government Authorities by referencing the international IEC 62474 database. Since IEC 62474 maintains current exemption lists, Governments may rely on this database without additional resources or time.